Dominic Preston

Staff Writer at Tech Advisor and Macworld covering all things tech and gaming, Executive Editor at Outermode, and occasional freelancer on film, TV, videogames, food & drink, lifestyle and travel.

Candid

Insider's Guide to Los Angeles - Candid Magazine

The City of Angels has a bit of a soured reputation in some circles when it comes to travel. A few too many people have hoped to visit the gleaming streets of Hollywood and found it instead slightly dishevelled – the walk of fame just that bit grimier than they imagined, the locals less celebrities and more ‘colourful’. Throw in the city’s infamously poor public transit system and the fact that the city is spread over miles and miles of land, and it can look like a daunting holiday prospect. I’
Primer

Next Stop: Morocco

Primer's Guide to Your Next Great Vacation. Morocco may not be the first place you think of when considering a vacation abroad, but it’s got a lot to recommend it – from some of the world’s best food and historic markets to beautiful weather and great surfing conditions. There’s still the allure of some old Hollywood romanticism to the country thanks to the lasting influence of Casablanca and countless spy films – not least last year’s Spectre. Oh, and it’s still pretty damn cheap once you cove
Primer

This Summer, Head to Central Europe

Primer's Guide to Your Next Great Vacation. Ask most Americans to reel off the greatest hits of Europe, the travel destinations you can’t miss, and you’ll likely get back some pretty similar answers. London, Paris, and Rome are all likely to figure in. Venice, Berlin, and Barcelona perhaps. And let’s not forget Amsterdam. It’s easy to see why these cities dominate, of course. For the most part, they’re the capitals of Europe’s major countries. They’ve got famous museums, well-known histories,
Candid

Four Seasons Hotel Prague - Candid Magazine

Once the hub of the Holy Roman Empire, Prague has rather lost its rightful place among the great medieval European cities, relegated in the popular imagination to stag dos and hen nights. Those so quick to write it off are missing out on a city rich with history, culture and architecture. Towering, shimmering spires loom over winding cobbled streets, where gothic churches jostle for space with neo-classical townhouses. At the heart of it all, with views over the historic Charles Bridge, lies th
Candid

Philadelphia’s ROOST Apartment Hotel

For all of their perks and luxuries, even the slickest of high-end hotels can be rather clinical places. The novelty of a new hotel room holds plenty of excitement, but it’s usually not too long before the thrill fades and you start to miss a few of those home comforts you’ve left behind. On the other hand, staying in a house or apartment while travelling might provide some of that home-away-from-home atmosphere, but at the cost of a certain unpredictability and excitement.
Candid

Gourmand's Paradise

Le Saint-James is a curious little hotel. Situated just outside of Bordeaux, it’s eschewed the city centre for the small village of Bouliac, up in the neighbouring hills. It’s built around an eighteenth-century farmhouse, but renowned architect Jean Nouvel expanded the building with four pavilions designed to contrast with, rather than complement, the central structure. Their rusty, chipped exteriors are designed to echo old French tobacco barns - a stark contrast to the modern, white, minimalist designs of the hotel’s interior.
Candid

Curzon at Ham Yard Hotel

As cinema ticket sales continue their slow decline, the UK has seen the rise of a new wave of luxury film-going alternatives. From three-course meals served during screenings, to screens where you can watch a film from the comfort of a sofa, there have been plenty of attempts to make cinema visits more competitive with watching a DVD at home, with ticket prices typically being inflated to compensate. Now Soho’s Ham Yard Hotel is the latest to try and create a cinema experience free of greasy na
Frontiers

7 European Culture Festivals

The Hay Festival of Literature & Arts, once described by Bill Clinton as the “Woodstock of the mind,” has been held annually since 1988 and sees authors, journalists, economists, scientists, philosophers and more come together in talks and debates. This year’s highlights include Queen guitarist and astrophysicist Brian May, Richard Dawkins, Stephen Fry, Carrie Fisher, Judi Dench, Bear Grylls and Ian McEwan. The festival will hold events around the centenary of the start of World War I and the 10